Take the “amateurism” regulations out of student sports - The collapse of amateurism in Japanese and US student sports

学生スポーツにおける「アマチュアリズム」規制を排除せよ。 〜日米学生スポーツにおけるアマチュアリズムの崩壊〜

Japanese Little League Baseball Player
Published 28 April 2015 | Authored by: Takuya Yamazaki

English

Introduction – the Contemporary Significance of the Collapse of Amateurism in Student Sports

In America the collapse of amateurism has suddenly gathered apace with the so-called O’Bannon case (O'Bannon v. NCAA (N.D. Cal. Aug. 8, 2014) and the trend towards unionisation in student sports. Originally, education was the pretext for American college sports controlled by the NCAA (The National Collegiate Athletic Association). However, as US college sport has become increasingly popular and American college sports is now a significant sports business with the NCAA in 2010 signing a $10b dollar agreement with Turner Sports to broadcast the NCAA’s March Madness basketball tournament from 2011-2014. It should be noted that US Collegiate system is one in which athletes are not paid for their labour.

Although this article shall examine below the issue of what practical raison d'etre ‘amateurism’ has in modern times, the author will argue that the concept does not exist to legitimise its regulations. As a result of this, it can be said that the phenomenon of the collapse of ‘amateurism’ only as an abstract concept is a trend to be welcomed in the sports world where the infringement of athletes’ rights occurs all too easily.

This article shall examine the future of regulations in student sports based on this significant movement in which amateurism is collapsing.

 

The Collapse of ‘Amateurism’ in Student Sports in Japan

In Japan, like in America, student sports have played a big role in the development of sports. Thus, the aforesaid concept of ‘amateurism’ has a history in being used to protect vested interests in student sports.

This is illustrated particularly with baseball, Japan’s most popular sport. Up until 1993 – the year Japan’s professional football league (J-League) came into being – baseball was the only professional sports league that existed in Japan. In baseball, ever since an incident in 1961 (detailed below) unreasonable regulations were continuously applied by amateur organisations.

In 1961, a professional baseball team midway through the amateur season plucked an amateur player and made him professional (this was named the “Yanagawa incident“ after the player Fukuzo Yanagawa who was signed by the professional team). This incident virtually severed the relations between professional and amateur sports for a prolonged period.

The regulation at the time prevented professionals and amateurs playing matches and training together (Article 10 of the previous Japan Student Baseball Charter, which was expired in April 2010); there were also severe restrictions imposed on players with professional experience in returning to the amateur game. In fact, professional players were forbidden to make a comeback in amateur baseball.

Even for a former professional player to become a student baseball coach following retirement they first had to be a school teacher for over ten years. Thus, due to the imposition of such harsh restrictions, it was virtually impossible to become a student coach (taking into account the time needed to gain a teaching certificate combined with the ten years of practice after a professional career as a player).

These harsh restrictions effectively closed the road to professional players post-retirement, who wanted a second career as a coach at either an amateur team, university or high school coach. On top of this, even university and high school baseball players lost out as it became apparent they could not receive lessons from these professional players. This situation continued for over forty years following the Yanagawa incident, at which point the regulations gradually became more relaxed.

In particular, from 1999 former professional players were permitted to enter amateur baseball teams belonging to the Japan Amateur Baseball Association (“JABA”), at a rate of up to two such players per team per season (under the current Article 11 of the JABA Rules. Currently up to three players are allowed). By the same token, from 2002 reforms were enacted, including making it possible for former professionals that played with JABA amateur teams for more than two years, to rejoin professional teams (Article 15.4 of the JABA Rules).

In order for former professional players to become student baseball coaches, in 1997 the condition that the said player had to work ‘post-retirement for over ten years as a school teacher’ were reduced to ‘over two years’ (under the Japan Student Baseball Association’s previous Rules of Reinstatement of Amateur Qualifications, which expired in July 2013).

Finally in 2013 – over fifty years since the Yanagawa incident – it became possible for professional players to coach an amateur team without having to work as a school teacher by taking prescribed training (the training period carried out on the professional side is one day and on the amateur side is two days) and an aptitude test (new Japan Student Baseball Association’s Rules of Reinstatement of Amateur Qualifications, effective from July 2013).

 

The Justification of ‘Amateurism’ as a Means to Guarantee the ‘Right to Receive an Education’

As aforementioned, there is a history of the amateur sport gradually relaxing the restrictions on accepting parties from the professional sport. However, a theoretical explanation for this relaxation and the rationale for the restrictions upon which this was premised was never provided.

During the dispute, in principle interaction between amateurs and professionals was prohibited. It was long debated that the regulations of the Japan Student Baseball Association’s (the association for high school and university baseball) Japan Student Baseball Charter (“JSBC”) – which prevented such interaction – should have been reformed. It was not until April 2010 when reforms to the JSBC were finally realised (Article 15 of the new JSBC).

The new JSBC not only brought with it an overhaul of the restrictions that prohibited interaction between professionals and amateurs, its reforms also signalled the beginning of a theoretical explanation regarding the peculiar regulations that blighted student baseball.

This theoretical explanation is focused on the guaranteeing of ‘student rights’ in the regulations of student baseball.

The preamble to the draft amendments of the JSBC, as quoted below, clearly specifies that these are based on the philosophy of student rights.

All the citizens of Japan shall have the right to receive an equal education under the Constitution of Japan; thus, a student shall have the right to receive such an education at the school to which he/she belongs. Accordingly, the school shall be obliged to put into effect this right.

In this sense, amateur baseball is a part of this school education, and amateurism shall be a fundamental element of this.

(Omission)

In recognition of this, this charter shall uphold to the extent necessary regulations regarding the role of student baseball and shall thereby attempt to cultivate a shared understanding between the relevant parties and organisations."

 

Are the Regulations In Line with the Pretext of Guaranteeing ‘The Right to Receive an Education’?

The grounds for the regulations in student baseball can be justified from the perspective of guaranteeing the student’s ‘right to receive an education’. This in itself means that the new JSBC shall include just principles.

As far as baseball is played as a student sport, it must also be carried out to the extent that it does not infringe the student’s right to receive an education. Even in the present day one thing that should be valued is the point that students and their freedoms should be protected from the pressures – commercial and societal – that are common with sports. However, there can be a tendency for unreasonable, excessive regulations to be carried out from the perspective of guaranteeing the rights of amateur stakeholders.

In fact at the time of writing this article in April 2015, this tendency still persists, as illustrated below.

Firstly, since 2013 the restrictions were significantly relaxed concerning parties that were formerly involved with professional baseball (e.g. retired players or parties that were previously linked to the professional game) being able to acquire qualifications as coaches in student baseball (e.g. in high school or universities) – in other words, the reinstatement of amateur qualifications. However, even now there are still massive restrictions on the interaction between current professional and amateur baseball players. Basically, unless it is authorised in the JSBC such parties cannot even practice together, let alone exchange technical guidance (Article 14.3 of the new JSBC).

Professional and amateur players may only train together annually during the offseason – for two months every December and January – and the place for this training is restricted to the professional player’s old school (interaction with parties that do not possess student eligibility is governed by Article 2.1 of the Japan Student Baseball Association’s Rule of interaction with parties that do not possess student eligibility). Furthermore, as the provision of technical guidance is also prohibited, it is inevitable that the relevant parties will hesitate to interact with each other due to the possibility of being in breach of regulations. For instance, professional players could even be reluctant to answer questions about baseball skills (e.g. how can they pitch the ball so fast?), despite the fact such technical matters may appear on that player’s own SNS account or website.

Secondly, regulations exist stipulating that the amount of remuneration (e.g. salary or compensation) a student baseball coach receives. This cannot, based on social norms, exceed the salaries of educators at JSBC-affiliated institutions (Article 24 of the JSBC).

Since the 2013 reforms, there have even been calls from traditional, die-hard amateur stakeholders that the many former professional players currently acquiring their coaching qualifications should coach students without any remuneration (or for less remuneration than was received originally – pre-reforms – by coaches in the amateur game).

In the US, although it was held in past litigation (see Law v. NCAA. 134 F.3d 1010 (10th Cir. 1998)) that the introduction of compensation limits for assistant coaches in the NCAA was in breach of antitrust laws, in Japan analogous restrictions exist that are even harsher than this.

In all truth, can it be said in Japan that these type of regulations are really for the purpose of guaranteeing student-athletes’ ‘right to receive an education’?

It took three years from April 2010 – when the new JSBC was reformulated based on the right of students to receive an education – until 2013 for the restrictions on former professional players being able to acquire coaching qualifications to be relaxed. The main reason for this was due to the strong objections of current amateur coaches against such relaxation of the rules; these parties feared a potential increase in competition from and the possibility of losing their jobs to the former professionals.

Amateur stakeholders have claimed since 2010 that former professional stakeholders without teaching credentials should not be recognised as coaches in student baseball. However, these claims are contradictory when considering the high number of ‘teaching professionals’; namely, baseball coaches without such teaching credentials who already teach in Japan’s high schools (although such parties are not former baseball professionals, they receive compensation from working in amateur baseball).

 

‘Amateurism’ Should Not be Used as Grounds to Justify Regulations

In the current day and age the concept of amateurism is still being used as a means to go beyond necessary regulation in order to justify implementing excessive regulation (this is mainly to protect vested interests). In light of this, a re-examination should be undertaken about whether it is appropriate to use ‘amateurism’, in the modern day, as the grounds to justify regulation.

In Britain, ‘amateurism’ has a history of being used to justify discrimination against the working classes (Masayuki Tamaki, What are sports? (Tokyo: Kodansha Ltd., August 1999), 27.). Originally, however, it was claimed that the fundamental meaning of this was due to the nature of sport; namely, that the ‘enjoyment of sport is in the competition’. Thus, in order for players to be able to reap the benefits from the ‘nature of sport’, amateurism was used to try to release athletes from the pressures (commercial and societal) of winning, which are commonplace in professional sports, and to try to guarantee their freedom.

From the viewpoint of specific tournaments, regulations in the form of competition conditions were required to govern eligibility matters. For instance, these were used to cover situations where it would be unreasonable to apply the same qualification criteria to amateurs, who could only train in their spare time, and to professionals, who had specific training regimes.

In other words, it can be said that the essence of ‘amateurism’ merely comes down to two points: (1) the fundamental spirit that sports are purely for enjoyment; and (2) to discern eligibility for tournaments.

Therefore the spirit specified in the first point should be realised simply by ensuring that athletes have an opportunity to play sports as amateurs and nothing beyond. Applying dogmatic regulations such as ‘it is bad to receive financial compensation for sport’ to all young athletes is overly-excessive and unnecessary.

 

The Tragedy of ‘Amateurism’ Being Used For Educational Purposes

With ‘amateurism’, irrespective of the fact that it is originally aligned to the spirit that sports are purely for enjoyment and that players are ‘free’ to compete as such, we must ask the question, why is the doctrine used to ‘restrict’ these players? It is against this background that sports have been used as a tool to educate in Japan.

During the mid-eighteenth century, at the start of the Meiji-era, Japan imported the concept of modern sports from Europe and America. More specifically, this importation coincided with the period when Japan’s policy was to strengthen its national power by: emulating the great powers of Europe and America; building a prosperous country and army; and encouraging new industry. Primarily, sports were used as a tool of ‘physical education’ which was viewed as essential for converting males into soldiers. This is because ‘physical education’ cultivated the mental training and sense of collective action that were important attributes for becoming effective soldiers.

Additionally, Teikoku (imperial) University, which at that time was attended by the children of the ruling elite in Japan, also imported the concept of ‘amateurism’ from Britain as a tool to justify discrimination against the working classes (Ibid., 27). Such a concept was broadly accepted in Japan without any resistance because Teikoku (imperial) University was virtually the only pathway to import European culture at that time.

As a result, in 1911 amateur regulations were codified to allow only certain types of men to participate in the qualification rounds for the Stockholm Olympics in the following year (more specifically these regulations were entitled: ‘Men who Live up to their Names as Students and as Gentlemen’. Kichiji Kimura, An Introduction to the History of Physical Education and Sport (Tokyo: Ichimura Publishing House, March 2010), 129.). Furthermore, this led to the establishment of participation regulations excluding certain parties from participating in the fifth National Sports Festival in 1917 (more specifically these regulations were entitled: ‘Parties who are at Present or were Previously Employed as Athletes or Sports Players’. Ibid., 129).

These events in Japanese sport set the tone for the concept of amateurism and led to sports development being centred on physical education within educational institutions.

Put simply, in Japan sports signify ‘physical education’ and are used as a tool for education (particular in the past with building a prosperous country and army; and encouraging new industry).

In the author’s opinion, it is important matter in ‘physical education’ is how to get young people to train; the focus is on ‘control’ not ‘freedom’. The concept of ‘physical education’ is completely opposed to notions like ‘sports should be played for enjoyment’. In Japan the purpose of sports, through physical education, is to cultivate people to be pliant and conform to the objectives envisaged by superiors or policymakers (e.g. this was formerly to build a prosperous country and army).

As a result of this, one could argue that sport as ‘physical education’ is focused not on the ‘freedom’ of players, but rather on the ‘control’ of these parties. Fostering this link between ‘education’ and ‘sport’, has led to the creation of provisions to ‘control’ under the guise of ‘amateurism’, such as that ‘sport shall not be played for financial gain’. This is regardless of the fact that, when considering the original concept of ‘amateurism’, it should have been that ‘the freedom to play sports without the purpose of receiving financial compensation shall be guaranteed’.

 

Taking the Concept of ‘Physical Education’ Out of Sports is Necessary to Realise the True ‘Amateurism’

It is clear that the pre-modern concept of ‘physical education’, which was utilised around a century ago to build the nation, does not sit well with the values of a mature country governed by the rule of law in the twenty-first century. Notwithstanding this, the fact that ‘amateurism’ is being put forward as an ‘educational objective’ means that even today it is still being used for the purpose of ‘educators’. In 2013, one problem with this thinking became abundantly clear when tragic incidents involving corporal punishment – a problem that also blights Japanese culture – by sports instructors were uncovered at the basketball club of a Japanese high school and in women’s judo (the idea in Japan is that such violence can be excused if it is for the purpose of education).

In the present day twenty-first century, nothing is more important in student sports and youth sports than to finally get rid of the anachronistic, backward notion that ‘sports’ are intrinsic to ‘education’. Even if the playing of sport culminates in it being linked to factors such as character education, this should come about as a result of it being based on athletes’ freedoms; in particular, the ‘right to receive an education’. It should not be realised through the imposition of prescribed values by schools.

It is absolutely absurd to enforce the dogma that ‘no financial gain should be made in relation to sports’ as ‘education’. The correct role for sports education to play is that both sports which are played for money and those which are not should be respected.

 

The Role of Student Sports in the Future

In light of the above considerations, it must be said that the mere fact that the owners or the sponsors of a club are schools does not justify regulations that all the student-athletes shall not be paid.

The purpose of participating in nationwide sports tournaments, like American collegiate basketball or American football leagues run by the NCAA or the Japanese high school baseball tournament called ‘Koshien’ run by Japan the High School Baseball Federation (“JHSBF”), is to be crowned champions and generate revenues, which are not disclosed to the public. Basically, such tournaments are nothing short of sports businesses.

These types of student sports are run not based on the principles of ‘amateurism’, where these sports are free from external commercial or societal pressures. On the contrary, being exposed to such strict pressures shows that these sports are operated based on the for-profit club sports model.

Accordingly, it must be said that in such tournaments the collusion of participating clubs (along with the NCAA and the JHSBF, which are like trade associations) to not make any payments to the players, may give rise to antitrust law problems.

 

Guaranteeing the Right to Receive an Education and Health & Safety

In the authors opinion, at present, the NCAA and the JHSBF would find it difficult to claim that they are reasonable under the guise of ‘education purposes’ not to pay student-athletes compensation. Furthermore, from the perspective above, doubts arise as to whether the regulations of these organisations can ever in anyway guarantee the ‘right for students to receive an education’.

In relation to this, as previously outlined it is essential to guarantee students the ‘right to receive an education’. However, more debate needs to be held on how the system can be developed to protect students from the pressures – commercial and societal – that are associated with winning at sports to guarantee the ‘freedom’ of students, rather than on the problem of how to ‘control’ students.

Some of the issues that must be debated in relation to developing the aforesaid system are outlined below.

  • Regulations that restrict the amount of time student-athletes must train. At present, due to the pressures of winning at sports, it is relatively easy for teams to ‘preserve the condition of players for sports’ by cutting back on their study time and burdening them with strict training regimes. The NCAA does restrict the number of hours a week an athlete can practice. Also, in relation to this Article 10 of the JSBC stipulates the following:
    • Article 10.1:
      Activities of the baseball team shall not impede the athlete’s right to receive an education, and the said activities shall not impair the health of the athlete.
    • Article 10.2*:
      In principle, the baseball team shall set aside at least one day a week from team activities for the player.
      * Please note that contrary to Article 10.2, it is commonplace for many high school baseball teams to still train seven days a week.
  • A system to protect student-athletes from being subjected to corporal punishment and harassment by sports instructors, which may result from the pressures to win at sports. (In 2013, as a consequence of the social problems that arose from the uncovering of corporal punishment scandals, which commonly occur in student sports, various sports organisations established consultation systems to deal with these matters.)
  • A system to adequately protect the health & safety of student-athletes, including from being made to play or train in extreme conditions (e.g. under the scorching summer sun in very high temperatures) and from other abuse (e.g. being made to over train by pitching too many times), which may result from the pressures to win at sports. (At the Japanese Koshien high school baseball tournament, during the height of summer when temperatures usually exceed 30 degrees celsius, player abuse problems often arise. These include making players play in matches that last for more than ten innings, or forcing pitchers to pitch consecutively for prolonged periods.)

Basically, for the future of student sports, rather than focus on ‘player control’ regulations (i.e. regulations that stipulate sports as being for ‘educational purposes’), it is much more prudent to concentrate, from the perspective of guaranteeing players’ freedom, on regulations that concern the ‘protection of players’ conditions’ so that they can compete in sports.

As a consequence of young players being exposed to the pressures that are associated with winning in sports (including commercial and societal pressures), such players can easily encounter problems with their right to receive an education or their health & safety. It should be noted that these problems are not only common in amateur sports, they also affect all sports, including professional sports.

Recently in football, the Spanish La Liga powerhouse FC Barcelona has been rocked by controversy at its renowned ‘La Masia’ player academy regarding the transfer and registration of minors that were in breach of FIFA’s rules. In fact, the FIFA rules in question are also concerned with guaranteeing the rights of young players to receive an education. Furthermore, the NCAA also has regulations concerning academic requirements. However with regard to this, more efficient regulations must be considered based on deeper debate and analysis. (Also, in South Korea, as a result of the negative impact from too much pressure/focus being placed on elite sports, debate has sparked over the necessity to guarantee players’ rights to receive an education.)

 

Conclusion

For the future of student sports focus should not be placed on regulations that concern sports instructors educating student-athletes. On the contrary, it is massively important that focus is properly concentrated on regulations that concern protecting student-athletes from various pressures, including from overbearing sports instructors.

If the regulations in student sports and youth sports are reformed in the above manner to properly take account of the human rights of young athletes, it may then be possible to reassess amateurism based on the concept as promulgated byPierre de Coubertin and its respective content therein.

日本語

はじめに〜学生スポーツにおけるアマチュアリズム崩壊の現代的意義

 アメリカでは、いわゆるオバンノン訴訟や、学生アスリートの労働組合化の動きなどにより、学生スポーツにおける「アマチュアリズム」崩壊への動きが一気に加速している。もともと教育のためという大義名分のもとに運営されてきたNCAA率いるアメリカの大学スポーツは、今では、どんどん人気がふくれあがり、2010年には、2011年から14年までのマーチマッドネスに関して100億ドルもの放映権契約をターナースポーツと結ぶほどまでに至っており、「選手人件費のかからない巨大スポーツビジネス」となるにまで至っているのが実態である。

 このように「アマチュアリズム」という考えは、スポーツ界において、既得権者の利権確保のために用いられてきた歴史がある。「アマチュアリズム」が現代においてどのような実質的存在意義を有するかという問題については後述するが、結論から言うと、規制を正当化する概念としての意義は存在せず、その意味で、この「アマチュアリズム」の崩壊という現象は、とかく、抽象的な概念のみで、選手の権利が侵害されることが起きやすいスポーツ界においては、歓迎すべき動きであるといえる。

 本稿では、そうした「アマチュアリズム」崩壊時代における、学生スポーツの規制のあり方等について検討することとする。

 

日本でも起きている、学生スポーツにおける「アマチュアリズム」の崩壊

 日本も、アメリカ同様、学校スポーツがスポーツの発展において大きな役割を果たしてきたため、こうした「アマチュアリズム」という概念は、学校スポーツにおける既得権益の保護のために用いられてきた歴史がある。

 特に日本屈指の人気スポーツであり、1993年にサッカーのプロリーグ(Jリーグ)が誕生するまでは、我が国唯一のプロリーグが存在するスポーツであった野球においては、1961年に発生したある事件以降、極めて不合理な規制が、アマチュア団体の都合により行われ続けてきた。

 そのきっかけとなった事件は、1961年に、プロ野球の球団が、社会人野球のシーズン中に、社会人野球の選手を引き抜いてプロ球団に入団させた事件である(引き抜いた選手の名前・柳川福三にちなんで柳川事件と呼ばれている)。これをきっかけにプロとアマの関係が悪化し、長い間、交流がほぼ断絶することになった。具体的には、プロとアマチュアが一緒に試合や練習をしてはならないなどの規制のみならず(旧学生野球憲章第10条)、プロ経験者がアマチュアに復帰する際にも厳しい制限が課せられ、プロ選手の社会人野球への復帰の禁止はもちろんのこと、学生野球の指導者になるにあたっても、プロ選手引退後、10年以上、学校の教師として働かない限り認められないという、事実上不可能ともいえる極めて重い制限が課せられていた(学校の教師として働くには教員免許が必要であり、高卒でプロに入団した選手は、教員免許の取得の勉強から始めなければならないので、必然的に引退後十数年を要することになる)。

 しかしながら、このような重い制限は、プロ選手の引退後のセカンドキャリア、つまりプロ選手を引退した後に、社会人野球や大学、高校の指導者となりたい選手の道を閉ざすものである上、高校野球や大学野球の選手にとっても、プロ選手からの教えを受けることができないことがマイナスであることは明らかである。そのようなこともあり、柳川事件から40年近く経った後、徐々に規制が緩和されるようになってきた。具体的には、1999年から、1シーズン1チームあたり2名までに限り、元プロ選手が社会人野球チームの統括団体である日本野球連盟所属の社会人野球チームに入団することが認められ(日本野球連盟登録規程第11条。現在は3名まで認められるようになっている)、さらに2002年からは、元プロ野球選手が日本野球連盟所属チームで2年以上プレーした場合、再びプロ野球チーム入りすることが可能となる(同154項)などの改革が行われた。また、前述の、元プロ選手が学生野球の指導者になるための条件も、「プロ選手引退後10年以上、学校の教師として働く」という条件だったのが、1997年に、「プロ選手引退後2年以上、学校の教師として働く」という条件に緩和された(20137月に失効した旧「学生野球資格の回復に関する規則」)。

 そしてついに、柳川事件から実に50年以上が経過した2013年、一定の研修(プロ側が行う研修=1日間と、アマ側行う研修=2日間)と適性検査を受けさえすれば、上記のように学校の教師として働かなくても、高校・大学の指導者になる資格を得ること(アマチュア資格の回復)ができることになった(20137月に発効した新「学生野球資格の回復に関する規則」)。

 

「教育を受ける権利」保障のための手段としての「アマチュアリズム」の正当化

 上記のように、日本の野球においては、プロ側が行ったことに対する報復措置として、プロアマ交流断絶という「規制」が行われ、それが50年以上にもわたって、アマチュア側の利権を確保する機能を果たしてきた。そこでいう「利権」の代表格は、特に学生野球の指導者市場において、元プロ関係者の参入を排除するという利権である。

 しかしながら、さすがにこのような単純な報復措置としての規制に対しては、長らく批判も多かった。そのため、前述のように、少しずつアマ側がプロ関係者の受け入れ条件を緩和していくという歴史を歩んだわけであるが、その緩和、そしてそもそもその前提としての規制そのものの合理性については、理論的な説明は行われていなかった。

 そうした中で、それまでプロとの交流を原則禁止としていた、学生野球協会(高校野球、大学野球の統括団体)の規約「日本学生野球憲章」の改正論議が行われるようになり、長い議論を経て、20104月にようやく改正が実現した。

 新しい日本学生野球憲章では、それまでプロアマの交流を禁止していたのを一変させて、プロとの交流を原則として容認する内容に変更された(新学生野球憲章第15条)ほか、学生野球における特殊な規制についての理論的な説明が初めて行われた。

 それは、学生野球に関する諸規制を「学生の権利」の保障という観点から理論的に説明したという点である。

 学生野球憲章改正案の前文は、そのような「学生の権利」という理念に立脚していることを明確に宣言している。以下にその前文の一部を引用する。

国民が等しく教育を受ける権利をもつことは憲法が保障するところであり、学生は自己の属する学校において教育を受ける権利をもつ。これに対応して学校は、その権利を実現する責務を負う。

この意味において、学生野球は、学校教育の一環であり、アマチュアリズムをその基底的要素とする。

(中略)

この憲章はこうした認識を前提に、学生野球のあり方に関する一般的な諸原則を必要な限度で掲げて、諸関係者・諸団体の共通理解にしようとするものである。もちろん、ここに盛られたルールのすべてが永久不変のものとは限らない。しかし、学生の「教育を受ける権利」を前提とする「教育の一環としての学生野球」という基本的理解に即して作られた憲章の本質的構成部分は、学生野球関係者はもちろん、我が国社会全体からも支持され続けるであろう。

 

「教育を受ける権利」の保障という大義名分に沿った規制であるといえるか〜今なお存在する「アマチュアリズム」の濫用

 このような学生野球における規制の根拠を、学生の「教育を受ける権利」の保障という観点から説明した、新しい日本学生野球憲章は、それ自体は、正当な理念を含むものといえる。野球というスポーツが、学校スポーツとして行われている以上、それは、学生の教育を受ける権利を害さない範囲で行われるべきものであり、スポーツに伴いがちな商業的、社会的プレッシャー等から学生の自由を確保する、学生を保護するという点は、現代においても重視されるべき価値の1つといえる。

 しかしながら、問題は、こうした理念を、具体的な規制の中で実現する段階において、その理念が不当にねじまげられて解釈されて、結局、理念との関係では、不合理ともいえる規制が、アマチュア関係者の「利権確保」の観点から行われてしまいがちだということである。

 現にこの原稿を書いている20154月現在においても、その傾向は未だ根強く残っている。以下にいくつかその例を挙げる。

 まず、前述のように2013年から、元プロ野球関係者(引退した選手その他過去にプロ野球に携わった関係者)が、高校野球などの学生野球において指導者になるための資格取得(アマチュア資格の回復)は、かなり自由化されたが、未だに、現役のプロ野球選手とアマチュア選手の交流は大幅に制限されており、日本学生野球協会の承認がない限り、技術指導はおろか、一緒に練習することさえ許されていない(新学生野球憲章第143項)。現役のプロ選手がアマチュア選手と一緒に練習できるのは、原則として、プロ選手のシーズンオフである毎年12月、1月の2ヶ月間に、そのプロ選手の母校の施設においてのみである(学生野球資格を持たない者との交流に関する規則第21項)。また技術指導を行えないという制約から、プロ選手は、例えば自らが開設するウェブサイトやSNSに寄せられる、野球の技術に関する質問(例えば、どうやったら速い球が投げられるかなど)について答えることさえも、規定に違反することを恐れて、躊躇せざるを得ない状況となっている。

 次に、指導者は、当該加盟校の教職員の給与に準じた社会的相当性の範囲を超える給与・報酬を得てはならないとする規定(学生野球憲章24条)が存在することである。しかも、2013年の改正以来、多くの元プロ野球選手が、学生野球における指導者資格を取得しつつある中で、旧来のアマチュア関係者からは、元プロ選手の指導は無償(あるいは従前から指導者として関わっているアマチュア関係者が受け取っている報酬よりも低価格)で行われるべきだという主張さえも行われている。アメリカにおいては、NCAAがアシスタントコーチの報酬制限を導入したことが、過去に訴訟において独占禁止法違反と判示されているが(Law v. NCAA. 134 F.3d 1010 (10th Cir. 1998))、日本ではそれよりも厳しい制限が存在しているのである。

 こうした規制は、本当に、学生アスリートの「教育を受ける権利」確保のために行われている規制であるといえるのであろうか。

 そもそも、学生の教育を受ける権利を中心に再構成された新しい「学生野球憲章」が施行された20104月から、元プロ選手の指導者資格解禁に至る2013年までは、実に3年もの期間がかかっている。その主たる理由は、元プロ選手の指導者資格を解禁することにより、競争が激化して、職を失う可能性のある現職のアマチュアの指導者からの強い抵抗であった。アマチュア関係者は、教員免許を持たない元プロ関係者に、アマチュア野球での指導を認めるべきではないということを、2010年以降も主張していたが、このような主張は、すでに多くの高校で教員免許を持たない「職業指導者」(元プロ関係者ではないが、アマチュア野球界において報酬を得て活動をしている教員免許を持たない指導者)が存在することと、著しく矛盾する、既得権保護のためとしか考えられない主張であった。

 

「アマチュアリズム」は、もはや規制の正当化根拠として使われるべきではない

 このように、未だに「アマチュアリズム」なる概念が、本来の規制の必要性を超えて、過大な規制が行われる理由(その主な目的は既得権確保)とされている状況においては、そもそも現代において「アマチュアリズム」を、諸規制の正当化根拠として用いること自体の妥当性が改めて問われなければならない。

 「アマチュアリズム」は、イギリスにおいて、労働者階級への差別を正当化する概念として用いられた歴史も有しているが(玉木正之「スポーツとは何か」講談社、1999年、27ページ)、もともと、その根源的な価値として主張されたものは、スポーツの本質は、「競技そのものを楽しむ」ことにあり、そうした本質を競技者が享受できるようにするために、勝利を宿命づけられるプロスポーツにおいて見られるような、商業的、社会的なプレッシャーから選手を解放し、選手の自由を確保しようというものであった。それが「アマチュアリズム」の根本精神であり、もともとの本質は、商業的、社会的プレッシャーからの選手の自由の確保という点である。また、他方では、具体的な大会において、職業的に練習しているプロと余暇において練習しているに過ぎないアマチュアが同一の条件で競技し合うことは不平等であるという観点からの競争条件としての規制=大会のeligibilityという側面での要請もあった。

 つまり、「アマチュアリズム」なるものの内実は、スポーツを純粋に楽しもうという根本的精神と、大会のeligibilityという点の2点にすぎない。そして、前者の根本的精神は、プロスポーツとは別にアマチュアスポーツを行う機会を与えることによって実現すればいいだけの話であり、それ以上に、若年選手すべてに対して「金銭を受け取るのは悪」であるかのようなドグマチックな規制を行って実現すべきものではない。言い換えれば、選手が、スポーツを行うにあたって、アマチュアとしてやるか、プロとしてやるかの2つの選択肢が存在すればいいだけの話であり、「学生は必ずアマチュアとしてスポーツをやらなければならない」と強制することにも全く意味がないのである。現にクラブスポーツとして発展してきたヨーロッパのサッカーでは、子供のうちから、ハイレベルな選手にとっては、サッカークラブに費用を負担してもらいながらプロを目指す選択肢と、あくまでアマチュアとしてプレーする選択肢の2つが用意されているのであり、彼らにとっては、アマチュアは1つの選択の結果にすぎないのである。

 そうだとすると、すべての(ハイレベルな)若年競技者に対して、「競技者は金銭を受領してはならない」などといった教条主義的な規制を課すことに意味はなく、そういう意味において、「アマチュアリズム」というものが規制の正当化根拠になるということはありえないものというべきである。単に「アマチュア」の概念が必要であるとすれば、それはアマチュア向けの大会においてのeligibilityとしての点だけであろう(それは例えば大会参加資格を21歳以下とか18歳以下などと定めるのと同じ意味で)。

 

教育目的という名の下に「アマチュアリズム」が主張される悲劇

 このように「アマチュアリズム」は、本来、スポーツを純粋に楽しむためという競技者の「自由」のための精神であったにもかかわらず、なぜ、競技者を「制約」する規制原理として使われてきたのだろうか。その背景には、スポーツが、日本において、教育のためのツールとして使われてきたという歴史がある。

18世紀後半、明治時代初期に、欧米から近代スポーツの概念を輸入した日本では、その輸入時期が明治初期、すなわち日本が欧米列強と肩を並べるべく、富国強兵、殖産興業をスローガンに国力を強化していた時期と重なったこともあり、主として、スポーツは、兵士となるための集団行動と基礎体力の養成等のための精神修養と教育に資するものとして重視され、「体育」(physical education)として発展を遂げることとなった。加えて、当時の日本におけるエリート支配層の子弟が通う帝国大学が、スポーツを含む欧米の文明を取り入れる窓口であったこともあり、イギリスから輸入した「アマチュアリズム」という一種の差別概念も、我が国において抵抗なく受け入れられた(玉木前掲27ページ)。

 その結果、1911年には、翌年のストックホルム五輪のための予選競技会の参加資格として、「学生たり紳士たるに恥じざる者」というアマチュア規定が成文化され(木村吉次「体育・スポーツ史概論(改訂2版)」市村出版、20103月、129ページ)、さらに1917年開催の第5回陸上競技大会には、「過去、及び現在において脚力もしくは体力を職業とせる者は無資格とする」という参加規定が定められるに至った(同129ページ)。

 このようにして、日本におけるスポーツは、アマチュアリズムの概念を基調とし、学生スポーツを中心に発展することとなったのである。

 つまり、日本においては、スポーツは、「体育」であり、教育(特に富国強兵、殖産興業のための教育)のためのツールとして用いられてきたのである。

 「体育」において重要なことは、いかに若者を修練させるかであり、「自由」ではなく「統制」が中心となる。スポーツを楽しむなどという考え方は、「体育」という概念に真っ向から反する考え方であり、「体育」を通じて、教育者=為政者の想定する目的(富国強兵など)に適合する人物になるための修練こそがスポーツの目的とされてきたのである。このような理由で「体育」としてのスポーツは、競技者の「自由」ではなく、競技者の「統制」が中心とされてきたのである。こうした「教育」と「スポーツ」の結びつきが、「アマチュアリズム」という名の下での、「金銭を受領してはならない」などといった「統制」につながっていったのである。本来の「アマチュアリズム」の考えからすれば、「金銭の受領を目的としないスポーツを行う自由を確保しなければならない」という規制であるべきだったはずなのに、である。

 

「体育」からの脱却こそ、真のアマチュアリズム

 こうした約100年前の国家目的に沿って作られた、前近代的「体育」概念が、21世紀における成熟した法治国家に見合わない価値観となっていることは明らかである。それにもかかわらず、「アマチュアリズム」は「教育目的」という名目と結びつけられて、「教育者」の都合のために、今なお利用されている現実がある。2013年に日本の高校のバスケットボール部や、女子の柔道などで行われていることが明らかとなり、問題となった日本の「体罰」文化も、こうした現実の具体的な表れの1つである(教育のためならば暴力も許されるという考え)。

21世紀の今日における学生スポーツないし若年スポーツにおいては、何よりこうした前近代的な「教育」概念と「スポーツ」とを切り離すことが絶対に必要である。スポーツをすることが、結果的に人格教育などに結びつく側面があるとしても、それは選手側の自由権であるところの「教育を受ける権利」に基づく選択の結果としてのものであるべきであり、学校側が、一定の価値を押しつける形で実現されるべきものではない。ましてや、「スポーツに関連してお金を受け取ることはあってはならない」というようなドグマをあたかも正しい価値であるかのような「教育」を行うなど論外というべきである。お金を受け取るスポーツとそうでないスポーツの双方があり、どちらもスポーツとして尊重されるべきであるというのが、正しいスポーツ教育のあり方である。

 

これからの学生スポーツのあり方〜プロクラブとアマチュアクラブ双方の存在を正面から肯定する必要性

 以上をふまえて考えると、学校をオーナーまたはスポンサーとするクラブであるからといって、すべて選手である学生に一律にお金を払わないことにするという規制を行うことは、およそ合理性を持ち得ないといわざるを得ない。

 アメリカのNCAAが行うバスケットボールやアメリカンフットボールのリーグ、そして日本の高校野球連盟が行う「甲子園」と呼ばれる、日本屈指の全国規模でのプロ野球トーナメント大会は、それぞれの参加クラブが勝利を目的として参加し、その興行に金銭的収入が伴う(そしてその内実は公表されていない)スポーツビジネスに他ならない。こうした学生スポーツは、決して「アマチュアリズム」の本旨であるところの、商業的社会的プレッシャーから無縁のスポーツ活動ではなく、むしろそのような厳しいプレッシャーにさらされた、営利目的でのクラブスポーツ、つまり学校をオーナーまたはスポンサーとした商業活動としてのクラブスポーツに他ならない。多くの学校が、優秀な学生アスリートを、奨学金をインセンティブにして勧誘しているのは、まさにその証左である。

 従って、このような大会において、参加校が談合して(ないしはNCAA、高野連のような事業者団体として)、選手に一律に金銭を支払わないとすることは、独禁法上問題が生じうる行為といわなければならない。

 また、NCAAや高野連のような、一定年齢の若年スポーツ市場に独占力を有すると考えられる団体が、学校を母体としないクラブチームの大会への参加を拒否するなどの行為も、独禁法上問題となる余地があるというべきである。

 つまり、NCAAや高野連に加盟するクラブは、選手に対して金銭的報酬を払うか否か、払うとしていくら払うかについては、各クラブが自由に決められるものとすべきであり、その金額に一律の制限(奨学金の上限)などを設ける場合は、独占禁止法上の問題が生じうるものというべきである(戦力均衡等、別の観点からの正当化が議論される余地はありうる)。201488日に米国カリフォルニア州連邦地裁が下した、いわゆるオバンノン訴訟の判決では、奨学金の上限規定が反トラスト法上合法とされる余地があることが示されているが、その点については疑問が残るといわざるを得ない。

 仮に、NFLNBA、あるいは日本のプロ野球のNPBが、高校生や大学生に相当する年齢の選手を対象とするクラブチームを育成機関として創設し、そのクラブチームが行うリーグ戦、トーナメント大会などが、今のNCAAや日本の高野連が行う大会に引けを取らないぐらい大きな大会に成長した場合は別であるが、現状、商業的収入を稼ぎうる大会を成り立たせるだけのトップ学生アスリートをほぼ独占している状態のNCAAや、日本の高野連が、高野連に属さないクラブチームに対して参入制限を課すなどの競争制限行為を行う場合は、独占禁止法上の問題が発生するものというべきであろう。

 このように見てくると、仮にNCAAや高野連が、奨学金などの対価を受領してプレーする選手から成るクラブが集まるリーグと、そうでない純粋なアマチュア選手から成るクラブが集まるリーグの双方を組成すれば、後者について、eligibilityの問題として、選手が金銭を受領してはならないと定めることは許される制約として可能といえるであろう。しかしながら現在の問題は、主として前者に相当する選手から成る、勝利と商業的収入を目的とするクラブの集まる大会について、学生が、他に同等の競技レベルで正当な報酬を得る選択肢が実際上存在しないまま、教育目的なる名目で、選手に金銭を払わずにクラブ(学校)が不当な利益を手にしているところにあるといえる。

 

これからの学生スポーツにおいて必要な規制〜学習権の確保とHealth & Safety

 上記のような筆者の主張、すなわち、現状のNCAAや日本の高野連が、学生に金銭を支払わないことを「教育目的」という名の下に正当化する余地はないという主張は、では、学校側は、学生の「教育を受ける権利」に着目した規制を一切行う余地がないのかという疑問を生むであろう。

 この点に関しては、前述したように、学生の「教育を受ける権利」を保障することは重要である。しかし、それは学生の「自由」をいかに確保するかという問題であって、むしろ、勝利を目指す商業的、社会的プレッシャーなどから、いかに選手を守るかという制度として議論されるべき問題である。

 だとすれば、ここにおいて制度として議論されなければならないことは、例えば以下のような点であると思われる。

      勝利へのプレッシャー等から、猛烈な練習を課せられ、勉強に割く時間が奪われがちな学生を保護するために、学生の練習の時間を制限する規制(1週間あたりの練習時間を制限する規制はNCAAにも存在し、また、日本の学生野球憲章の第10条には、「野球部の活動は、部員の教育を受ける権利を妨げてはならず、かつ部員の健康を害するものであってはならない」(第101項)、「原則として1週間につき最低1 日は野球部としての活動を行わない日を設ける」(第102項)という規定が存在する。しかし、未だに週7日毎日練習している高校野球部も多いのが実態である)。

      勝利へのプレッシャー等から、指導者から選手に対して行われがちな体罰などのハラスメントから選手を守る制度(日本では2013年に、学校スポーツにおいて恒常的に行われてきた体罰が社会問題になったため、各競技団体が相談窓口を設けるなどの対応が行われている)

      勝利へのプレッシャー等から、炎天下、高気温の中で、連投させられるなどの酷使から選手を守る制度(日本の高校野球の夏の「甲子園」大会では、30度を超える炎天下の中で、10イニング以上投げさせられたり、連投を強いられるなどの選手の酷使が問題となっている)

 上記のうち、最初の点は、選手の「教育を受ける権利」の保障に関わるものであり、そのあとの2点は、選手の健康・安全に関する問題である。つまり、これまでのような「教育目的」での「選手の統制」という類いの規制ではなく、選手の自由保障という観点からの「選手の保護」という規制こそが、これからの学生スポーツにおける規制の中心となるべきである。

 商業的、社会的プレッシャーから、若年選手の教育を受ける権利や健康・安全が害されがちであるという問題は、アマチュアだけの問題ではなく、プロを含めた全スポーツに共通した問題である。サッカーにおいても、近時、スペインのFCバルセロナの若年選手育成機関「ラ・マシア」が、未成年者の国際移籍に関するFIFAルール違反として問題とされているが、こうしたFIFAルールによる規制も、若年選手の教育を受ける権利の保障という点に関わるものである。NCAAのアカデミック・リクワイアメンツのような規制もあるが、この点は、より深い議論、検証のもとに、効果的な規制が検討されなければならない(韓国でもエリートスポーツ偏重への弊害から、選手の教育を受ける権利担保の必要性が議論されている)。

 

おわりに〜若年アスリートの人権が尊重されるスポーツ界へ

 以上のように、これからの学生スポーツにおいては、指導者が学生に対して行う教育のための規制、ではなく、学生を指導者等からのプレッシャーから守るための規制という観点が重要視されるべきである。そして、そのようにして、学生スポーツ、若年スポーツにおける諸規制を、若年アスリートの人権という観点から構成し直したとき、ピエール・ド・クーベルタンが提唱した、アマチュアリズムという概念も、また、その本質に根ざした意味を持つものとして、再評価されうることになるであろう。

Related Articles

About the Author

Takuya Yamazaki

Takuya Yamazaki

Takuya, a Japanese Attorney-at-Law, is the founder and Managing Partner of Field-R Law Offices, a niche sports and entertainment legal practice based in Tokyo.

Takuya has vast legal and business experience in sports both in Japan and internationally. He is a member of the FIFA Dispute Resolution Chamber, a position held since 2009. In 2016 he became the Chairman of FIFPro Division Asia/Oceania.

  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Leave a comment

Please login to leave a comment.