WADA president blog: expanding funding for clean sport

published on 10 May 2016

Press Release

This article is written in English with a French translation underneath.

9 May 2016 – It is not an overstatement to say that sport’s integrity is being questioned like no time before. It is not just doping issues that confront us – but governance failures in international sport federations, and match-fixing claims at the highest level of sport. We face challenges on a number of fronts, but with doping adversely affecting the athletes themselves, there can be no doubt that it is still the greatest threat to modern-day sport.

In combatting doping, we can be proud by how far we have come since the advent of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) in 1999. In light of the Festina scandal gripping the sport of cycling at the time, this Agency was set up as the global response to the need for a harmonious approach to tackle the threat of doping. Of all the things that have been achieved during that time – an international UNESCO Treaty, the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP), investigative powers, partnerships with pharmaceutical companies – we can above all be thankful that there is now one set of global rules in place no matter the sport or country you compete in. Those rules – under the World Anti-Doping Code – have brought fairness to the system, and they are the set of rules under which we all now operate. However, we operate under the Code with our belts tightened, and we in the anti-doping community feel the squeeze evermore with the expanding amount of work we are asked to do.

In light of this work, and the proliferation of doping scandals at the sharp end of sport, I took the opportunity at the WADA Anti-Doping Organization Symposium in March to raise the issue of expanding our funding, and called on broadcasters and sponsors to consider funding clean sport.

WADA’s annual budget is approximately USD 30 million per year; that money provided through a 50-50 split respective of the two halves of WADA: governments and the sport movement. WADA has to cut its coat according to its cloth, and conducts its activities – which range from education to compliance, research to athlete awareness – effectively.

WADA has to cut its coat according to its cloth, and conducts its activities effectively

During my Presidency, the agency has explored new revenue streams to help us meet the challenges of the day. One example is the Anti-Doping Research Fund, the joint creation of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and WADA. Thanks to the foresight of its President, Thomas Bach, the IOC committed to fund up to USD 10 million towards athlete-centred anti-doping research, something which governments were able to match to the tune of USD 6 million. The result was a total pot of USD 12 million which has been put towards innovative science and social science research, helping us develop new and improved detection methods for prohibited substances and methods; and, understand the behavioral reasons behind an athlete’s decision to dope.

Following the outcomes of the recent Independent Commission investigation into widespread doping in athletics, I confirmed at the WADA Foundation Board meeting in November that I would write to governments to ask for contributions towards further investigations, the call for which has become ever-more vociferous following other doping allegations in recent months. I have been buoyed by the commitment of governments of the world to make substantial contributions, which I will now ask the IOC to match dollar for dollar.

Such initiatives are helpful, but to really confront the scale of doping, we all need to dig deeper. Sport is a huge, global business in 2016, and the industry – though regrettably not anti-doping – is awash with money. The sports market is generally considered to consist of sponsorships, gate revenues, media rights (which includes broadcast television) and merchandising. A conservative estimate in 2015 would place its value just under USD 145 billion (Source: PwC Outlook for the global sports market to 2015).

Sport – though regrettably not anti-doping – is awash with money; a conservative estimate in 2015 would place its value just under USD 145 billion."

Media rights – the lion’s share of which comes from television broadcasters – is worth north of USD 35 billion alone. These broadcasters, who serve billions of sports fans worldwide, must have an interest in clean sport just as the athletes and fans do. After all, as sport’s integrity is increasingly under threat, it is the fans – the very people that turn on the television to watch sport – which will tune out, and directly affect the broadcasters. Why not, as some have argued for before, suggest some form of tariff on the media rights holders that pay for the sports rights? To impose, for example, a minute 0.5% tariff on this USD 35 billion annual media rights figure would instantly put USD 175 million more in the anti-doping coffers. Increasing WADA’s budget five-fold -- that would provide USD 175 million more per year with which to protect the clean athlete. With such extra funds, we could make a greater impact in protecting the rights of the clean athletes, and in turn uphold the integrity of sport. This significant boost to clean sport could allow for further investigations, more quality-based testing, better research, and could allow us to disseminate that all-important values-based education so that we get the message across to tomorrow’s athletes. The question with this is, of course, who would shoulder that cost: the broadcasters themselves, or would they themselves pass it on to the sports federations, many of whom are profitable enterprises, some of whom are not? This is a debate we must now have.

Global Media rights are estimated to be north of USD 35 billion per year; if you imposed a tariff of just 0.5% on the rights holders that would give WADA an extra USD 175 million per year to protect the clean athlete

It doesn’t end with the broadcasting side. Sponsorship is also an enormous contributor to the sport industry. Major sports sponsors should start to look at how they might support clean sport. Take pharmaceutical companies, for example, with whom the anti-doping movement has strong relations. While anti-doping has an interest in protecting the rights of the clean athlete, the pharmaceutical industry has a significant stake in ensuring that its products are being used for legitimate medical reasons, not for abuse by athletes seeking an edge.

The annual value of global sport sponsorship is thought to be approaching a staggering USD 50 billion (Source: PwC Outlook for the global sports market to 2015). Sponsors are the sport industry’s fastest growing source of money, investing a significant amount of money not only in sports events but in elite athletes so that they can bask in the glory that comes from a sport star’s success. For sponsors, all the benefits such association with a sport or a star athlete can have may be easily tarnished through their athlete’s doping scandal. Doping is a threat to the sponsor’s business, so why would sponsors not want to fund clean sport, and have a stake in the positive values clean sport exudes? Such a move would be in step with public opinion, and from a public relations perspective would be advantageous, too. As one person suggested to me, why does an organization that sponsors an athlete, who has been sanctioned for doping, not attribute the money it would pay the athlete during that sanction to the anti-doping movement, instead? That is surely where its interest should lie.

"The annual value of global sport sponsorship is thought to be approaching a staggering USD 50 billion. Doping is a threat to a sponsor’s business so why would sponsors not want to fund clean sport efforts, and have a stake in the positive values clean sport exudes? Such a move would be more in step with public opinion, and from a public relations perspective would be advantageous, too.

We need to rally all sport’s stakeholders – including broadcasters and sponsors – to the clean sport cause. The public loves sport. In fact, gate revenues are estimated to cover one third of the sport industry’s total value (Source: PwC Outlook for the global sports market to 2015); clear evidence of the public’s desire to watch sport en masse. Public opinion is also firmly in favour of a level playing field, and so we all have a duty to protect the clean athletes and ensure the fairest, most efficient system possible is in place for athletes across the world. Sport, government, athletes, broadcasters and sponsors alike share this important duty.

“We all have a duty to protect the clean athletes and ensure the fairest, more efficient system possible is in place for athletes across the world. Sport, government, athletes, broadcasters and sponsors alike share this important duty.


BLOGUE DU PRÉSIDENT DE L'AMA: ACCROÎTRE LE FINANCEMENT POUR UN SPORT PROPRE

Le 9 Mai 2016 – Il n'est pas exagéré de dire que l'intégrité du sport est aujourd’hui remise en question comme jamais auparavant. Nous n'avons pas seulement affaire à des problèmes de dopage, mais aussi à des échecs de gouvernance dans des fédérations sportives internationales et à des allégations de matchs truqués dans le sport de haut niveau. Nous avons des défis à relever sur plusieurs fronts, mais comme le dopage affecte négativement les sportifs eux-mêmes, il ne fait aucun doute qu’il constitue toujours la plus grande menace pour le sport moderne.

Dans la lutte contre le dopage, nous pouvons être fiers de ce que nous avons accompli depuis l'avènement de l'Agence mondiale antidopage (AMA) en 1999. Dans la foulée du scandale Festina qui avait frappé le cyclisme à l'époque, l'Agence a été créée pour répondre, à l’échelle mondiale, à la nécessité d'une approche concertée pour réagir à la menace du dopage. Parmi toutes les choses qui ont été réalisées au cours de cette période – un traité international de l'UNESCO, le Passeport biologique de l'athlète (PBA), des pouvoirs d'enquête, des partenariats avec des sociétés pharmaceutiques –, le fait qu'il existe maintenant un ensemble de règles mondiales s'appliquant à tous les sports et à tous les pays est certes le résultat le plus satisfaisant. Ces règles – réunies dans le Code mondial antidopage – ont rendu le système plus équitable et constituent le cadre à l'intérieur duquel nous évoluons tous maintenant. Cependant, nous travaillons avec peu de moyens et, dans la communauté antidopage, nous ressentons de plus en plus de pression en raison de la quantité croissante de travail qui nous est demandée.

À la lumière de ce travail et de la prolifération des scandales de dopage dans les hautes sphères du sport, j'ai décidé de soulever la question de l'accroissement de notre financement lors du Symposium de l'AMA pour les organisations antidopage en mars dernier, et j’ai invité les diffuseurs et les sponsors à envisager de financer le sport propre.

Le budget annuel de l'AMA est d'environ 30 millions de dollars US. Cette somme provient en parts égales des deux volets de l'AMA: les gouvernements et le mouvement sportif. L'AMA doit vivre selon ses moyens et mener ses activités – qui vont de l'éducation à la conformité en passant par la recherche et la sensibilisation des sportifs – avec efficacité.

« L'AMA doit vivre selon ses moyens et mener ses activités avec efficacité. »

Au cours de ma présidence, l'Agence a exploré de nouvelles sources de revenus pour nous aider à relever les défis du moment. Le Fonds de recherche antidopage, création conjointe du Comité International Olympique (CIO) et de l'AMA, en constitue un exemple. Grâce à la clairvoyance de son président, Thomas Bach, le CIO s'est engagé à consacrer jusqu'à 10 millions de dollars US à la recherche antidopage axée sur les sportifs, un financement que les gouvernements ont été en mesure d'égaler à hauteur de 6 millions de dollars US. Le résultat: une enveloppe de 12 millions de dollars a été consacrée à des recherches innovatrices en sciences et en sciences sociales, ce qui nous a aidé à mettre au point de nouveaux et meilleurs moyens de détection des substances et des méthodes interdites et à comprendre les raisons comportementales qui sous-tendent la décision d’un sportif de se doper.

À la suite de la récente enquête de la Commission indépendante sur le dopage généralisé en athlétisme, j'ai confirmé lors de la réunion du Conseil de fondation de l'AMA de novembre que j'écrirais aux gouvernements pour leur demander de contribuer à d'autres enquêtes, qui sont réclamées avec encore plus d'insistance depuis les nouvelles allégations de dopage dans les derniers mois. J'ai été enchanté de l'engagement des gouvernements du monde entier à faire des contributions substantielles, que je vais maintenant demander au CIO d'égaler dollar pour dollar.

De telles initiatives sont utiles, mais pour vraiment faire face à l'ampleur du dopage, nous devons tous creuser plus profondément. Le sport, en 2016, est une énorme entreprise mondiale, et l'industrie ne manque vraiment pas d’argent – contrairement au secteur antidopage. Le marché du sport est généralement composé de sponsorings, d'entrées, de droits médias (qui comprennent la télédiffusion) et de marchandisage. Une estimation prudente en 2015 établissait sa valeur à un peu moins de 145 milliards de dollars US (Source: PwC Outlook for the global sports market to 2015).

« Le sport ne manque vraiment pas d’argent – contrairement au secteur antidopage. Une estimation prudente en 2015 établissait sa valeur à un peu moins de 145 milliards de dollars US. »

Les droits médias – dont la part du lion provient des télédiffuseurs – valent au-delà de 35 milliards de dollars US à eux seuls. Les diffuseurs, qui servent des milliards d'amateurs de sport dans le monde, doivent avoir un intérêt dans le sport propre, tout comme les sportifs et les amateurs. Après tout, si l'intégrité du sport est de plus en plus menacée, ce sont les amateurs – ceux-là mêmes qui allument leur téléviseur pour regarder les matchs et les compétitions – qui s'en détourneront, ce qui aura une incidence directe sur les diffuseurs. Pourquoi ne pas proposer, comme certains l'ont fait valoir, une certaine forme de tarif pour les titulaires des droits médias qui paient les droits pour les sports? Imposer, par exemple, un minuscule tarif de 0,5 % sur ces 35 milliards de dollars US de droits médias par année ajouterait instantanément 175 millions de dollars US dans les coffres de l’antidopage. Multiplier par cinq le budget de l'AMA fournirait 175 millions de dollars US de plus par année pour protéger les sportifs propres. Avec ces fonds supplémentaires, nous pourrions avoir un impact plus grand sur la protection des droits des athlètes propres et, par ricochet, maintenir l'intégrité du sport. Ce coup de pouce important pour le sport propre pourrait permettre de réaliser d'autres enquêtes, plus de contrôles basés sur la qualité et une meilleure recherche. Il nous aiderait aussi à faire de l’éducation fondée sur les valeurs, une démarche de la plus haute importance, de manière à diffuser notre message aux sportifs de demain. La question qui se pose, bien sûr, est de savoir qui assumerait ces coûts : les diffuseurs eux-mêmes? Ou bien refileraient-ils la facture aux fédérations sportives, dont beaucoup sont des entreprises rentables, mais d'autres pas? C'est un débat que nous devons tenir maintenant.

« Les droits médias valent au-delà de 35 milliards de dollars US par année. Imposer un petit tarif de 0,5 % aux titulaires des droits médias fournirait 175 millions de dollars US de plus par année à l'AMA pour protéger les sportifs propres. »

Cela ne s'arrête pas à la diffusion. Le sponsoring apporte aussi une énorme contribution à l'industrie du sport. Les principaux sponsors devraient commencer à réfléchir aux moyens qu’ils pourraient prendre pour appuyer le sport propre. Prenons les sociétés pharmaceutiques, par exemple, avec lesquelles le mouvement antidopage a tissé des liens étroits. Le secteur antidopage s’attache à protéger les droits des sportifs propres, mais l'industrie pharmaceutique a tout intérêt à ce que ses produits soient utilisés pour des raisons médicales légitimes, et non par des sportifs à la recherche d'un avantage indu.

À l'échelle mondiale, on estime à près de 50 milliards de dollars US la valeur annuelle des sponsorings (Source: PwC Outlook for the global sports market to 2015). Les sponsors sont la source de financement de l'industrie du sport qui connaît la croissance la plus rapide. Ils investissent beaucoup d'argent non seulement dans les manifestations sportives, mais aussi dans les sportifs d'élite, afin que le succès des vedettes du sport rejaillisse sur eux aussi. Mais tous les avantages que peuvent tirer les sponsors d'une telle association avec un sport ou un sportif peuvent facilement être ternis par un scandale de dopage frappant leur protégé. Le dopage est une menace pour les affaires des sponsors, donc pourquoi ne voudraient-ils pas financer le sport propre et être associés aux valeurs positives qu’il évoque? Une telle démarche serait en phase avec l'opinion publique et serait avantageuse aussi sur le plan des relations publiques. Comme quelqu’un me l'a dit, pourquoi une organisation qui parraine un sportif ayant été sanctionné pour dopage ne donnerait-elle pas au mouvement antidopage la somme qu'elle lui aurait versée durant cette sanction? C'est sûrement là que son intérêt devrait se situer.

« À l'échelle mondiale, on estime à près de 50 milliards de dollars US la valeur annuelle des sponsorings. Le dopage est une menace pour les affaires des sponsors, donc pourquoi ne voudraient-ils pas financer le sport propre et être associés aux valeurs positives qu’il évoque? Une telle démarche serait en phase avec l'opinion publique et serait avantageuse aussi sur le plan des relations publiques. »

Nous devons rallier tous les partenaires – y compris les diffuseurs et les sponsors – à la cause du sport propre. Le public aime le sport. En fait, on estime que les entrées couvrent le tiers de la valeur totale de l'industrie du sport (Source: PwC Outlook for the global sports market to 2015), ce qui témoigne clairement d’un désir extrêmement répandu dans le public d’assister aux matchs et aux compétitions. L'opinion publique est également très en faveur de règles du jeu équitables. C'est pourquoi nous avons tous le devoir de protéger les sportifs propres et de veiller à ce que le système le plus juste et le plus efficace possible soit en place pour les sportifs du monde entier. Le sport, les gouvernements, les sportifs, les diffuseurs et les sponsors partagent tous cette importante responsabilité.

« Nous avons tous le devoir de protéger les sportifs propres et de veiller à ce que le système le plus juste et le plus efficace possible soit en place pour les sportifs du monde entier. Le sport, les gouvernements, les sportifs, les diffuseurs et les commanditaires partagent tous cette importante responsabilité. »

Views

30194

Related Articles

Leave a comment

Please login to leave a comment.

Official partners 

BASL
Soccerex Core Logo
SLA LOGO 1kpx
YRDA Logo2
SAC logo LawAccord

Copyright © LawInSport Limited 2010 - 2018. These pages contain general information only. Nothing in these pages constitutes legal advice. You should consult a suitably qualified lawyer on any specific legal problem or matter. The information provided here was accurate as of the day it was posted; however, the law may have changed since that date. This information is not intended to be, and should not be used as, a substitute for taking legal advice in any specific situation. LawInSport is not responsible for any actions taken or not taken on the basis of this information. Please refer to the full terms and conditions on our website.