Why the Russian Olympic doping saga shows the need for a radically different approach to anti-doping in sport

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Published: Thursday, 08 February 2018. Written by Jack Anderson 1 Comment

Sport, and particularly the International Olympic Committee (IOC), needs a new approach to doping – one in which1 it frankly and independently interrogates what went wrong and uses that analysis to secure the future.

Mistakes have been made to the extent that doping scandals have dominated the build-up to the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics. This is one of the IOC’s marquee events, and the financial viability of the Olympic “movement” depends on it.

The background to the latest scandal is easily explained. But the lessons that need to be learned are not so simply analysed.

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About the Author

Jack Anderson

Jack Anderson

Jack Anderson is Professor and Director of Sports Law Studies at the University of Melbourne. The sports law program at Melbourne was one of the first to be established globally in the mid-1980 and continues to expand at the Melbourne Law School, which itself is ranked in the top 10 law schools globally.

Jack has published widely in the area including monographs such as The Legality of Boxing (Routledge 2007) and Modern Sports Law (Hart 2010) and edited collections such as Landmark Cases in Sports Law (Asser 2013) and EU Sports Law (Edward Elgar 2018 with R Parrish and B Garcia). He was Editor-in-Chief of the International Sports Law Journal from 2013 to 2016.

Jack is a former member of CAS (2016-2019).  He is currently a member and arbitrator for World Athletics’ Disciplinary Tribunal, the National Sports Tribunal of Australia and the Football Federation of Victoria.  He is a member of International Hockey Federation’s Integrity Unit and Basketball Australia’s National Integrity Advisory Committee.  in 2019, he was appointed to the International Tennis Federation’s Ethics Commission and is currently a Board Member of Harness Racing Victoria.

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Comments (1)

  • Paul Horvath

    • 18 February 2018 at 00:15
    • #

    I agree with all that Jack. It is important that in the fight to ensure that we have clean sport, a level playing filed for all athletes, we don't inadvertently punish some innocent athletes as "collateral damage". As you say, if the system can be improved, then we will all be better off.

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