INTERPOL Integrity in Sport Bi-Weekly Bulletin 9-28 July 2020

Interpol

INVESTIGATIONS

Bulgaria

Application by Aleksandrina Naydenova against provisional suspension from tennis denied by independent Anti-Corruption Hearing Officer

Independent Anti-Corruption Hearing Officer Prof Richard McLaren has denied an application by Bulgarian tennis player Aleksandrina Naydenova to lift a provisional suspension originally imposed on her on 27 December 2019.

Due to restrictions in place at the time of the provisional suspension, the original decision by Prof McLaren was not publicly reported.

As a result of today’s decision the 28-year old will continue to be prohibited from competing in or attending any sanctioned tennis event organised or recognised by the governing bodies of the sport.

The provisional suspension relates to an investigation by the Tennis Integrity Unit into alleged breaches of the Tennis AntiCorruption Program (TACP).

The Section of the TACP relating to the granting of provisional suspensions is as follows:

3. Provisional Suspension. a. The PTIOs may at any time make an application to an AHO for a Provisional Suspension of a Covered Person, including (i) before a Notice has been issued, (ii) before a Hearing or (iii) at any time after a Hearing but prior to the AHO’s issuance of a written Decision. Except as provided in Section G.4.a (in which case a Provisional Suspension is mandatory), a Provisional Suspension may be imposed if the AHO is satisfied on the preponderance of the evidence that at least one of the conditions set out at (i) and (ii) below are met:

i. a Covered Person has (i) failed to comply with a Demand or (ii) delayed or obstructed, without reasonable justification, compliance with a Demand or purported to comply with a Demand through the provision of any object or information that has been tampered with, damaged, disabled or otherwise altered from its original state; or

ii. (i) there is a likelihood that the Covered Person has committed a Corruption Offense punishable by permanent ineligibility; (ii) in the absence of a Provisional Suspension, the integrity of tennis would be undermined; and (iii) the harm resulting from the absence of a Provisional Suspension outweighs the hardship of the Provisional Suspension on the Covered Person.

Ms Naydenova is currently ranked 239 in WTA singles.

The Tennis Integrity Unit is an initiative of the Grand Slam Board, the International Tennis Federation, the ATP and the WTA, who are jointly committed to a zero tolerance approach to any form of betting-related corruption in tennis.

Source: 24 July 2020,

Tennis Integrity Unit

Tennis

https://elinkeu.clickdimensions.com/m/1/84431288/p1-b20206-ed5e78c5c6f24b1b98dd31f9d240f3f8/1/934/1c33cbc2-6e77-444d-a29f-60b925e4c6b0

Spain

Application by Enrique López Pérez against provisional suspension from tennis denied by independent Anti-Corruption Hearing Officer

Independent Anti-Corruption Hearing Officer Prof Richard McLaren has denied an application by Spanish tennis player Enrique López Pérez to lift a provisional suspension originally imposed on him on 19 December 2019.

Due to restrictions in place at the time of the provisional suspension, the original decision by Prof McLaren was not publicly reported.

As a result of today’s decision the 29-year old will continue to be prohibited from competing in or attending any sanctioned tennis event organised or recognised by the governing bodies of the sport.

The provisional suspension relates to an investigation by the Tennis Integrity Unit into alleged breaches of the Tennis AntiCorruption Program (TACP).

The Section of the TACP relating to the granting of provisional suspensions is as follows:

3. Provisional Suspension. a. The PTIOs may at any time make an application to an AHO for a Provisional Suspension of a Covered Person, including (i) before a Notice has been issued, (ii) before a Hearing or (iii) at any time after a Hearing but prior to the AHO’s issuance of a written Decision. Except as provided in Section G.4.a (in which case a Provisional Suspension is mandatory), a Provisional Suspension may be imposed if the AHO is satisfied on the preponderance of the evidence that at least one of the conditions set out at (i) and (ii) below are met:

i. a Covered Person has (i) failed to comply with a Demand or (ii) delayed or obstructed, without reasonable justification, compliance with a Demand or purported to comply with a Demand through the provision of any object or information that has been tampered with, damaged, disabled or otherwise altered from its original state; or

ii. (i) there is a likelihood that the Covered Person has committed a Corruption Offense punishable by permanent ineligibility; (ii) in the absence of a Provisional Suspension, the integrity of tennis would be undermined; and (iii) the harm resulting from the absence of a Provisional Suspension outweighs the hardship of the Provisional Suspension on the Covered Person.

Mr López Pérez is currently ranked 196 in ATP singles.

The Tennis Integrity Unit is an initiative of the Grand Slam Board, the International Tennis Federation, the ATP and the WTA, who are jointly committed to a zero tolerance approach to any form of betting-related corruption in tennis.

Source: 24 July 2020,

Tennis Integrity Unit

https://elinkeu.clickdimensions.com/m/1/84431288/p1-b20206-4e3c694be4cc45b2ade3a4edd350c3f1/2/188/1e12339f-ada2-4514-9be5-4ae7eef20b93

SENTENCES/SANCTIONS

Belarus;Greece

Tennis umpire, tournament director suspended in match-fixing probe

LONDON -- The Tennis Integrity Unit has fined and suspended a Belarusian chair umpire and a Greek tournament director for match-fixing and betting offenses.

Umpire Alexey Izotov was suspended for three years and fined $10,000 on Thursday for failing to report a corrupt approach and of soliciting other umpires to become involved in manipulation of match scoring.

The Tennis Integrity Unit said Izotov, 22, failed to report a corrupt approach he received in November 2019 while he was officiating as a chair umpire at an ITF Women's event in Minsk, Belarus.

The approach allegedly offered him payment in return for delaying the inputting of scores to his scoring device, which would allow others to bet on matches.

Tournament director Antonis Kalaitzakis was suspended for 20 months and fined $6,000 after admitting to betting on tennis and failing to report knowledge or suspicion of corruption to the Tennis Integrity Unit.

Four months of the suspension and $3,000 of the fine were suspended on condition that no further breaches of the Tennis AntiCorruption Program are committed.

The TIU said Kalaitzakis held online betting accounts through which he placed 127 wagers on tennis between 2013 and 2016, in breach of laws prohibiting any form of betting on tennis. He was also found to have failed to report knowledge or suspicion of corruption by a third party.

Kalaitzakis, 37, is a tournament director for ITF events in Greece.

Source: 17 July 2020,

ESPN Tennis

https://www.espn.com/tennis/story/_/id/29476800/tennis-umpire-tournament-director-suspended-match-fixing-probe

Cyprus

European T10 League in big trouble after team suspended on corruption charges: Report

Limassol Gladiators, one of the five teams competing in the European Cricket Series Cyprus, have been suspended from the European T10 League following their match against Amdocs on Tuesday, July 21. The Limassol Gladiators have been suspended from the European T10 League, pending an anti-corruption investigation over match-fixing, after concerns were raised over suspicious behaviour. The situation leads to believe that Limassol Gladiators possibly abandoned their match against Amdocs during the innings break.

European T10 League corruption: European T10 League match-fixing Reports also claim that one major betting company is refusing to pay out on the match, which was streamed on various platforms around the world. It is believed that a reported $2 million had been traded on the match solely on betting site, Betfair. However, with other markets - legal and illegal - included, that figure could be much more significant. This has also led to the entire European T10 League coming under heavy scrutiny.

The suspicions of the ICC's Anti-Corruption Unit (ACU) were first raised through suspicious betting patterns prior to the game. Amdocs, (a telecom company with a base in Cyprus) had not won a game in more than a year, but the market clearly had expectations for their success against the Limassol Gladiators. The Amdocs had twice conceded in excess of 100 runs in their recent games but the Gladiators were restricted to 79 for 4 in their 10 overs.

n response, Amdocs were struggling at 14 for 3 after two overs but some unbelievably poor bowling from the Gladiators led them to a stunning win in just 7.1 overs. One of those overs included six wides, with one of the deliveries going down the legside to the boundary. One of the traders spoke to ESPNcricinfo and explained that it was the "most blatant, unsubtle and stupid incident of fixing ever seen in cricket."

European T10 team suspended: European T10 league corruption The ICC have confirmed that their ACU is taking a close look at the match for potential match-fixing. In the meantime, the Limassol Gladiators will not be able to play any further part in European Cricket Network competitions. There is still no suggestion that the Amdocs players were aware of any of the potential wrongdoings. The ECN is yet to make any comment on the Limassol Gladiators v Amdocs match.

Source: 22 July 2020,

Republic world

Cricket

https://m.republicworld.com/sports-news/cricket-news/european-t10-league-in-trouble-team-suspended-on-corruption-report.html

Ireland

Igor Labuts: Former Athlone Town goalkeeper wins match fixing appeal

Former Athlone Town goalkeeper Igor Labuts has been cleared of a match fixing allegation after an appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

The Latvian was banned by the FAI for 12 months in September 2017 for suspicious betting patterns after a 3-1 loss to Longford Town that April.

The CAS panel agreed that the result of the First Division match was manipulated.

However it did not support the FAI's contention that Labuts was involved

Athlone and the Professional Footballers' Association of Ireland supported Labuts after the ban was initially handed out.

"I thought this day would never come," said Labuts in a statement.

He added: "It is hard to explain how personally devastating the last three years have been for me and my family. I came to Ireland with the intention of making it to the Premier Division and I hoped to put myself in the shop window with Athlone Town.

"I am not the best goalkeeper in the world, but I thought with the right training and experience, I could improve my consistency levels and have a reasonable career in the League of Ireland.

"This was taken away from me by the FAI. I understand completely that they had to investigate the match and I co-operated in full.

"It was hugely disappointing to me that I was implicated without any evidence of wrongdoing. I was guilty only of making a mistake which some of the best goalkeepers in the world have made, or worse in some cases.

"To be crystal clear, I did not manipulate, have not manipulated and never would be involved in manipulating a football match. Integrity in football is the most important element of the game. Without that, we have nothing."

After the verdict on Friday, PFAI solicitor Stuart Gilhooly tweeted: "Igor Labuts wins his appeal at CAS. He is not guilty of match fixing. Justice at last after three years and three negative findings at the FAI. Such a pity he had to go to CAS for justice but he deserves it."

Source: 17 July 2020,

BBC Sport Football

https://www.bbc.com/sport/football/53449013

BETTING

Asian Racing Federation

Asian Racing Federation adds of two global experts to Anti-Illegal Betting Taskforce

The Asian Racing Federation’s Anti-Illegal Betting Taskforce (‘the Taskforce’) on Monday announced that it has strengthened its capability to protect global racing integrity with the addition to the Taskforce of former Chief Commissioner of Victoria Police, Graham Ashton, and the Project Manager of INTERPOL’s Match-Fixing Task Force, Claudio Marinelli.

Both have decades of experience in combatting international sports corruption linked to illegal betting and other financial crimes.

As Chief Commissioner, Mr. Ashton was the key driver in setting up Victoria Police’s Sporting Integrity Unit, which was the first law enforcement unit anywhere dedicated to combatting match-fixing and is regarded as the leading police sports integrity unit in the world.

Mr Marinelli, a Criminal Intelligence Officer seconded to INTERPOL from Italy’s Guardia di Finanza (Financial Police), has been instrumental in leading the work of INTERPOL’s Match-Fixing Task Force since the creation of this initiative, which involves law enforcement agencies and other stakeholders from around the world to combat match-fixing and corruption in sport and maintains a global network of match-fixing investigators to share intelligence and best practices.

With the addition of these new members, the Taskforce now comprises 14 experts in sports and racing integrity, law enforcement, academia, and intergovernmental relations.

Winfried Engelbrecht-Bresges, chairman of the Asian Racing Federation, said: “The threat from illegal betting is one of the key challenges facing the global racing industry. The ARF is committed to combatting this threat both by sharing its own expertise, and engaging with other stakeholders from the wider sports environment. We are delighted to add the expertise of Mr Ashton and Mr Marinelli to the Taskforce.”

Martin Purbrick, chairman of the ARF’s Anti-Illegal Betting Taskforce, said: “Graham Ashton’s vast knowledge of and passion for horse racing, his leadership of sports integrity and his status as a well-regarded senior police officer will be of huge benefit to the Taskforce and the ARF.

“INTERPOL’s Match-Fixing Task Force is one of the world’s leading bodies dedicated to combatting sports corruption and the ARF Taskforce is delighted to engage with it and its project manager, Claudio Marinelli, who likewise has huge experience in the field of sports integrity,"

Source: 27 July 2020,

ThoroughbredNEWS Horse Racing

https://www.thoroughbrednews.com.au/News/Story/asian-racing-federation-adds-of-two-global-experts-to-anti-illegal-betting-taskforce124645?section=International

ODDS AND ENDS

Tennis Integrity Unit

TIU Briefing Note: April to June 2020

International Tennis Integrity Agency (ITIA) to assume responsibility for bringing disciplinary charges from January 2021

The June meeting of the Tennis Integrity Supervisory Board has agreed that the International Tennis Integrity Agency (ITIA) will become responsible for making charging decisions in future corruption cases. Under the current process, four PTIOs (Professional Tennis Integrity Officers) representing the sport’s governing bodies, make those decisions, which are then referred to an independent hearing officer to take forward.

The Board decision to transfer that responsibility to the ITIA is a further and significant move towards the organisation’s operational and legal independence from the ATP, WTA, ITF and Grand Slams.

A senior legal counsel is currently being recruited to perform the new role, in consultation with the CEO and Senior DirectorInvestigations. Referral to independent Hearing Officers will continue to be part of the process

With effect from January 2021, the ITIA will replace the TIU as the independent integrity organisation for professional tennis.

Privately organised tennis tournaments generate 24 suspicious match reports during lockdown

Privately organised tennis tournaments staged during the lockdown of professional tennis between April and June, resulted in 24 suspicious matches being reported to the TIU by regulated betting operators.

Suspicious betting on tennis during the lockdown is seen as a firm indicator that corruptors remain active, and are likely to increase their focus on the sport when professional tennis resumes in August.

In addition to the 24 Level 1 reports, one match played at a WTA $125k tournament in 2019 has been retrospectively classified as a match alert, following review by the TIU.

Tennis Integrity Unit delivers first combined anti-corruption and anti-doping education in preparation for Return to Tennis

The Tennis Integrity Unit’s Education department has delivered a series of Return to Tennis webinars to prepare the sport for the integrity challenges that may await upon the resumption of the professional game.

The initiative was developed to address the exceptional circumstances created by the global Coronavirus lockdown. With reduced playing and earning opportunities and months of inactivity, the risks associated with betting-related corruption and doping violations are believed to have increased.

A series of bespoke webinars delivered by TIU Education, in partnership with the TADP (Tennis Anti-Doping Programme) provided guidance and information to equip players to recognise and manage the risks associated with the resumption of tennis. These include anticipated renewed activity by corruptors targeting players and others who may be financially vulnerable. On the anti-doping front, advice and updates were provided for testing, Covid-19 health issues, supplements and medications.

The series of 10 player Education webinars, which included language translation options, was made available to all professional players. It is being followed by similar Return to Tennis sessions designed for match officials and tournament personnel during July.

The joint initiative from the sport’s anti-corruption and anti-doping bodies is the first instance of a combined approach being taken to player education. This will become a standard practice when the TADP – currently administered by the ITF - joins the International Tennis Integrity Agency (ITIA) at an appropriate date, to be confirmed.

Project Egypt

TIU Education has also been working closely with the President and Executive Team of the Egyptian Tennis Federation (ETF) to develop a bespoke integrity education strategy for Egyptian tennis. The strategy forms part of their response to corruption sanctions imposed on a number of prominent domestic players in recent times and will deliver a comprehensive prevention programme to raise awareness and educate the Egyptian tennis community. To signal the launch of this initiative, more than 140 players, coaches, officials and federation staff attended a webinar co-hosted by the TIU and ETF. The webinar provided an overview of the integrity landscape in tennis and the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program rules

USTA National Tennis Centre awarded ITF Gold Level status

The United States Tennis Association’s National Campus in Orlando, Florida has become the second National Tennis Centre (NTC) to receive ITF Gold Level status, following the French Tennis Federation's national training centre in Paris. The accreditation process includes a nine-point set of Integrity standards and best practice policies developed by TIU Education for NTCs to adopt.

Disciplinary decisions – April to June 2020

Between April and June 2020 five individuals - three players and two match officials - were subject to disciplinary sanctions for breaches of the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program. Among them, former Egyptian player Youssef Hossam, became the 27th individual to receive a lifetime ban from the sport for match fixing offences:

https://www.tennisintegrityunit.com/media-releases/french-tennis-official-anthony-pravettoni-suspended-and-fined-bettingtennis-offences https://www.tennisintegrityunit.com/media-releases/youssef-hossam-banned-life-multiple-match-fixing-and-corruptionoffences https://www.tennisintegrityunit.com/media-releases/venezuelan-match-official-armando-alfonso-belardi-gonzalez-suspendedand-fined-corruption-offences https://www.tennisintegrityunit.com/media-releases/tunisian-tennis-player-majed-kilani-banned-seven-years-and-fined-7000- after-conviction-match-fixing-and-associated-corruption-charges https://www.tennisintegrityunit.com/media-releases/brazils-pertti-vesantera-banned-five-years-and-fined-15000-afterconviction-betting-facilitating-and-non-reporting-charges

These sanctions have previously been announced by the TIU and are included here as a retrospective record.

The Tennis Integrity Unit is an initiative of the Grand Slam Board, the International Tennis Federation, the ATP and the WTA, who are jointly committed to a zero tolerance approach to corruption in tennis.

Source: 10 July 2020,

Tennis Integrity

Unit Tennis

https://elinkeu.clickdimensions.com/m/1/84431288/p1-b20192-9442a42a052844fa9f766b34ffafe84c/1/71/c8ab8578-9488-4be9-a25a-17979c0a70

MATCH FIXING

Armenia

Huge match-fixing scheme uncovered in Armenian soccer

A lengthy international investigation into Armenian soccer has exposed a massive match-fixing conspiracy.

The investigation was conducted by Armenia’s National Security Service (NSS) and Interpol and implicated 54 people and five clubs in Armenia’s First League (which is in fact the second division in Armenia; the top is the Premiere League). Forty-five people have received a lifetime ban from international soccer and the five clubs have been disqualified for two years.

“The decisions were made after the Football Federation of Armenian (FFA) received undeniable evidence from international organizations and law enforcement agencies,” FFA President Armen Melikbekyan said in a July 2 statement announcing the investigation’s results.

Melikbekyan was elected president of federation in December following the departure of his predecessor, Artur Vanetsyan, who was head of both the NSS and FFA during the time that the matches were fixed but then fell out with Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan. The investigation began during Vanetsyan’s tenure at the FFA; he has since become a prominent government critic, but the soccer investigation seems not to have a political tinge to it.

Evidence for the scheme was gathered over a year and a half, Artur Azaryan, the general secretary of FFA told local website vnews.am. “UEFA has provided us with a detailed report on each team's games for the season, as well as the individual actions of all the players and their chances of participating in the match-fixing.”

Many of the implicated players were foreign, in particular Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, and Latvian. Several of them had had previous records of match fixing.

Kirilis Grigorovs, a Latvian national, was involved in match-fixing controversies in Latvia, Ireland, the Czech Republic, and Cyprus before signing on with FC Yerevan in September 2019.

Midfielders and goalkeepers were disproportionately represented among the named players, as match fixing typically depends on defensive “lapses.”

“If we look closely, you see that none of the goalkeepers were locals and the central midfielders also mostly were foreign,” said Rafael Khalatyan, the editor of armfootball.com, in an interview with Eurasianet. “These people were exposed in match fixing scandals in other countries, like Egor Lugavoy from Torpedo, Yuri Okul, a coach from Ukraine who was disqualified in Ukraine and now has been disqualified with FC Aragats, Vitali Ridlevich from Belarus also played for Aragats. In other words, they were people who knew how the process of match fixing worked.”

It's not clear who organized the scheme, and the NSS and FFA have not given any clues. Second-tier soccer in the former Soviet Union is widely susceptible to match fixing, as the teams have few fans, the matches aren’t televised, and the outcomes are of interest mainly to bettors. Neighboring Georgia also has been the subject of several match-fixing scandals and investigations.

“In this particular case there were a suspicious number of bets [on the fixed matches] in Asia, especially China,” said one source with an Armenian bookmaker, speaking to Eurasianet on condition of anonymity.

As a result of the investigation, the FFA has tightened the restrictions for licensing a club for the First League. The people implicated in the scheme will not face charges as match fixing isn’t a crime under Armenian law, but the FFA is trying to change that. “We have applied to the Ministry of Justice to come up with a legislative initiative and to define a relevant article in the Criminal Code,” Azaryan said.

Source: 9 July 2020,

Eurasianet

Football

https://eurasianet.org/huge-match-fixing-scheme-uncovered-in-armenian-soccer

India

Fake T20 tournament in India for the purpose of match-fixing

India is regarded as the birth place of all kinds of match fixing and in cricket. This time there were the allegations of organizing a fake T20 league in a village in Mohali, India. Live streaming apps Fancode claims that they have no involvement with the tournament...

Source: 14 July 2020,

bdcrcrictime Cricket

https://www.bdcrictime.com/fake-t20-tournament-in-india-for-the-purpose-of-match-fixing/

Pakistan

Bill submitted in NA against corruption, fixing in sports: report

The proposed criminalisation of match-fixing in Pakistan has inched closer to fruition as MNA Iqbal Muhammad Ali Khan confirmed that a bill in this regard has been submitted in the National Assembly.

The MQM politician is quoted as saying by Daily Jang that he has presented the bill in the lower house of the parliament

Earlier this week, Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) Chairman Ehsan Mani, in an interview with Cricbuzz said that the board planned on establishing a stringent framework that would punish corrupt elements severely.

"Having the appropriate legal framework to go after corruptors and match fixers is very important. We have to have the strongest possible deterrent to protect the game. I believe that every major cricket playing country should criminalize matchfixing," he said.

Earlier this year, several former cricketers, including Aqib Javed, had called for criminalisation of corruption in sports in order to deter episodes such as the 2017 Pakistan Super League fixing scandal.

Source: 15 July 2020,

PSL Cricket

https://www.geosuper.tv/latest/5809-bill-submitted-in-na-against-corruption-fixing-in-sports-report

Tennis Integrity Unit

Tennis officials brace for uptick in match-fixing alerts when tours resume

Anti-corruption officials in tennis are bracing for a potential uptick in match-fixing alerts when the official tours restart later this summer due to the significant number of formal reports of "suspicious matches" that came to the attention of the Tennis Integrity Unit during the lockdown triggered by the coronavirus pandemic.

"We anticipate a heightened sense of integrity concerns when the tours resume, especially at the lower levels [Challenger and ITF World Tour events]," Mark Harrison, head of communications for the TIU, told ESPN on Tuesday. "There will be a renewed level of gambling, and a small percentage of that may involve corrupt gambling. That's why we made a [recent] statement that there continues to be suspicious activity."

Last Friday, the TIU reported that regulated betting operators had reported 24 suspicious matches for the second quarter of the year. Such reports are not outright claims of match-fixing but alerts to suspicious betting patterns and/or activity. That was despite the lack of tour play since the coronavirus outbreak caused the official game to shut down in mid-March. The number concerns anti-corruption officials because there were only 33 reports of suspicious matches in the same quarter in 2019, when both the ATP and WTA, along with the minor league circuit operated by the ITF, were in full swing.

"This was not a huge spike in activity," Harrison said of the most recent reports. "But there also was a great deal less tennis being played."

The 24 alerts issued for this last quarter all stemmed from events created and staged while the ATP and WTA have been idle. As the events that have been created and played over the past four months are not part of the official game, they do not come under the jurisdiction of the TIU. But the agency was monitoring them because, Harrison said, "It's good to have a feeling for the whole integrity picture."

One of the main sources of concern for anti-corruption officials is the economic stress that players, especially less successful ones, are facing in these uncertain times.

"The tours being closed down means that some people may have been vulnerable [to corruption] because their earnings have been restricted or curtailed," Harrison said, adding, "And gamblers and corrupters won't go away."

While the TIU has no jurisdiction over exhibitions and other special events or tournaments that exist outside the ATP, WTA and ITF game, players are covered at all times by the anti-corruption rules they must agree to in order to compete in the official game. While the TIU has no jurisdiction over non-tour events, players are still subject to the same punitive measures should they be found guilty of anti-corruption violations.

One of the TIU's main concerns has been that recent pop-up events, because they are outside the purview of the TIU, haven't embraced or adopted the safeguards against corruption that tour events, including the Grand Slams, observe and enforce. Those include precautions like player advisories and monitoring accreditation and security to prevent activities like "courtsiding," which involves sending information directly via text from the court while a match is in progress, thus enabling the recipient to know the outcome of a point before it is formally reported on an Internet site.

Tournaments earn significant revenue by selling data to providers who, in turn, charge betting operators for access to that data, including point-by-point "live scoring" that services bettors. Match-fixing hurts both tournaments and the credibility of betting operators, so they work hand-in-hand to report suspicious activity to the TIU.

"There has been a massive range of different events over this three-month period, and that's great for the players and the people involved in the sport," Harrison said. "We have no issue with that; we encourage and welcome it. But we also need to keep an eye on the integrity side of things."

Source: 14 July 2020,

ESPN Tennis

https://www.espn.com/tennis/story/_/id/29461093/tennis-officials-bracing-uptick-match-fixing-alerts-tours-resume

Ukraine

New Jersey suspends betting on Ukrainian table tennis after match-fixing alert

The New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement on Thursday instructed the state's sportsbooks to suspend betting on all table tennis events in Ukraine or any matches involving six players, after being warned of potential match-fixing.

The Sports Wagering Integrity Monitoring Association alerted New Jersey regulators on July 7 of match-fixing concerns regarding Ukrainian table tennis, according to the notice provided to sportsbooks by gaming enforcement and obtained by ESPN.

"While there is not yet any evidence that any match fixing occurred in New Jersey, due the nature of the alert, the Division is suspending approval for wagering on all table tennis events in the Ukraine, including but not limited to the Setka Cup, WIN Cup, and TT Cup," the notice states. Offering betting on matches involving Liliia Zaitseva, Ivan Gaysin, Karen Dzhanibekyan, Eduard Panichev, Anastasia Efimova and Gleb Zotov is also prohibited, regardless of location, according to the notice.

Colorado gaming regulators also suspended betting on table tennis events taking place in Ukraine on Thursday.

With most major sports halted by the coronavirus pandemic, betting on obscure international table tennis became increasingly popular at U.S. sportsbooks, with hundreds of thousands of dollars wagered daily on matches that took place throughout the day. However, an ESPN report in May found uncertainties surrounding Ukrainian and Russian table tennis leagues, including what governing bodies were overseeing leagues like Setka Cup.

Following ESPN's report, the Indiana Gaming Commission suspended betting on any table tennis events not sanctioned by the sport's top governing bodies -- International Table Tennis Federation and European Table Tennis Union -- while Colorado, New Jersey and Nevada, among others, continued to allow wagering on leagues like Setka Cup.

The president of the Ukrainian Tennis Table Federation on March 30 urged the stoppage of Setka Cup matches due to the pandemic, saying that anyone who played was subject to disqualification from future UTTF competitions. The UTTF would later disqualify 365 players for competing in Setka Cup matches during the pandemic.

The New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement's suspension of betting on Ukrainian table tennis remains in effect until further notice.

Source: 10 July 2020,

ESPN

Table Tennis

https://www.espn.com/chalk/story/_/id/29436278/new-jersey-suspends-betting-ukrainian-table-tennis-match-fixing-alert

Vietnam

FIFA bans 11 Vietnamese youth players for match fixing

Eleven players of Dong Thap FC’s youth team received a worldwide ban from FIFA over match fixing during the national U21 tournament. During the opening match of U21 national qualifiers between Dong Thap and Vinh Long last year, 11 players of the former bet VND150 million ($6,480) the game would end with two goals or less. With the final score reading 1-1, they won back their money and an extra VND133 million ($5,748), which they split. Dong Thap later qualified for the U21 national tournament, where they reached the semifinals.

According to FIFA's decision issued Thursday, the heaviest punishment was given to Huynh Van Tien, who came up with the idea of match fixing and enticed other team members to join in. FIFA gave Tien a five-year ban from all football activities worldwide, effective starting May 11.

Ten other players, including Tran Cong Minh, Vo Minh Trong, Nguyen Nhat Truong, Nguyen Anh Phat, Le Nhut Huy, Giang So Ny, Tran Huu Nghia, Cao Tan Hoai, Duong Vu Linh and Kha Tan Tai, received a six-month ban from worldwide football activities.

Among the 11 players, Minh and Trong were members of the national U19 team that qualified for the AFC U19 championship last year.

Previously on May 11, Vietnam Football Federation (VFF) also suspended these players. In particularly, Tien was fined VND5 million ($216) alongside a five-year ban from football competitions in Vietnam. Others were fined VND2.5 million ($108) and banned for six months.

In recent years, several footballers in Vietnam have been punished for their involvement in match fixing.

At 2005 Southeast Asian Games, seven Vietnamese football players, including rising talents, were caught throwing a match. One player was sentenced to four years in jail while the others received suspended sentences.

Nine years later, nine players of Vissai Ninh Binh FC were banned for betting on matches in AFC Cup, in which the mastermind was jailed for 30 months

Source: 16 July 2020,

VN Express Football

https://e.vnexpress.net/news/sports/football/fifa-bans-11-vietnamese-youth-players-for-match-fixing-4131440.html

POLICY

GLMS

A Study of Betting Operators and their Sponsorship of Sport

The study is based on GLMS methodology and includes recommendations for ensuring that betting sponsorship has only a positive impact on the health of sports. A call to action

GLMS issues this study as a call to action in the face of a systemic global problem that, if allowed to continue, will be to the detriment of global society. The vision and mission of GLMS has been since 2017 to safeguard sport Integrity by developing a culture of Integrity and Social Responsibility through various activities in addition to detecting suspicious betting patterns.

This includes advising regulators as to what provisions need to be introduced when it comes to legalising sports betting and protecting sports values and sustainable market conditions. An in-depth look at the Asian betting market, betting operator sponsorships in sports and trends

The study is based on a specific methodology and addresses trends in betting sponsorships, notably within football and basketball, toucing on other sports as well. A special focus is placed on the Asian Betting Market, its background, growth and the potential risks and threats

The study takes into account the COVID-19 pandemic, which only highlights the need for more stringent regulation, ensuring that betting sponsorship remain only a positive impact on sports.

The study also looks at facts and figures in a number of countries in Europe, where betting sponsorship is particularly commonplace. Regulations and recommendations

The study explores in a snapshot the existing regulations and legislations addressing betting sponsorship of sports, including the recently published UK House of Lords ‘Time to Act to reduce gambling-related harm’, as an illstration of the increasing focus being placed on this issue. The study also touhes on the International Convention on the Manipulation of Sports Competitions (CETS 215) which addresses betting, operators, sports and regulatory authorities.

The study ends with a number of recommendations facilitating the safe practice of betting sponsorship of sports. While this study focuses on the impact of sponsorship and makes recommendations for regulating that element, it is also clear that the gaming industry as a whole is one that merits wider scrutiny from governments, investigative authorities, internet service providers, technology firms and many others besides. Today, some operators are able to layer their business interests to avoid infringement while simultaneously seeking to attract betting losses from some of the poorest people in the world. In the future, it is hoped that more efforts can be made across the breadth of society to curb these activities.

All facts in the document have been compiled from open source information and any opinions are those of GLMS and not intended to place targeted blame but rather to encourage higher awareness. copyright GLMS all rights reserved 2020

Source: 24 July 2020, Global Lotteries Monitoring System https://glms-sport.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/20_GLMS_SPONSORSHIP_REPORT_JULY2020.pdf

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