WADA publishes redesigned, more athlete-friendly, 2021 Prohibited List

WADA

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) publishes today the 2021 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods (List); the 2021 Summary of Major Modifications and Explanatory Notes; and the 2021 Monitoring Program. The 2021 List, which has been redesigned in order to improve navigation and usability for athletes and their support personnel, was approved by WADA’s Executive Committee (ExCo) during its meeting on 14-15 September 2020 and comes into force on 1 January 2021.
 
The List is one of the International Standards that are mandatory for all Signatories of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code). It designates what substances and methods are prohibited both in- and out-of-competition and which substances are banned in particular sports.
 
WADA Director General Olivier Niggli said: “WADA is pleased to publish the 2021 Prohibited List in its newly designed format; which, we believe, will be easier for athletes and their entourage to navigate. We kindly ask athletes, their entourage and all stakeholders to review the List carefully and to take particular note of this year’s modifications to avoid inadvertent use of substances and methods that are prohibited in sport for 2021.”

“Every year, the List undergoes extensive consultation involving some of the most qualified experts in the fields of science and medicine, including chemistry, endocrinology, haematology and pharmacology. This helps to ensure that any substance or method that may provide performance enhancement, or that may negatively impact athlete health or the spirit of sport, are considered in a timely manner so as to maintain a level playing field for clean athletes.”

2021 List Redesign
 
As it relates to the List’s redesign, the improvements include:

  • A table of contents that provides a non-exhaustive list of examples of medical conditions for which substances in the different classes may be prescribed;
  • An introduction that defines some terms used in the List;
  • Headings in each class indicating which substances or methods are prohibited at all times or in-competition, which classes are specified versus non-specified, and, where applicable, identification of the substances of abuse within a class;
  • Well-defined headings for the classes and sub-classes;
  • Exceptions and notes within categories that are now more clearly identified; and
  • A new index at the end of the document, listing the substances and methods mentioned in the List.

Major Modifications
 
As it relates to modifications, the major ones are outlined below:

  • Substances of abuse: During the two-year review process for the 2021 version of the Code, WADA received considerable stakeholder feedback related to substances of abuse where it was felt that the use of some substances included in the List was often unrelated to sport performance. Accordingly, Article 4.2.3 was added to the Code, and cocaine, diamorphine (heroin), methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA/“ecstasy”) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have been identified as substances of abuse in the 2021 List. This means that if an athlete can demonstrate that the use of any of these four substances was out-of-competition and unrelated to sport performance, the suspension imposed will now be three months and may be reduced to one month if the athlete completes a drug rehabilitation program.
     
  • Prohibited Method M2.2: Chemical and physical manipulation: In accordance with the newly introduced Article 4.2.2 in the 2021 Code, it will now be possible to identify a prohibited method as “specified”. Accordingly, intravenous infusions and/or injections of more than a total of 100 mL per 12-hour period, except for those legitimately received in the course of hospital treatments, surgical procedures or clinical diagnostic investigations, have now been classified as “specified”. This means that an athlete may receive a reduced sanction if it can be proven that this method was not used for doping purposes.

Meanwhile, implementation of the following major modification to the List will come into force on 1 January 2022:

  • Glucocorticoids: The draft 2021 List, which was considered by WADA’s ExCo during its September 2020 meeting, proposed prohibiting all injectable routes of administration of glucocorticoids in-competition. While this modification was approved, the ExCo asked WADA Management to implement the prohibition on 1 January 2022, to allow enough time for broad communication and education of athletes, their entourage and medical personnel so that there is a better understanding of the practical implementation of washout periods to avoid inadvertent Adverse Analytical Findings. It will also allow WADA-accredited laboratories the time to update their procedures to incorporate the revised and substance-specific reporting values; and, for sports authorities to develop educational tools for athletes, and for medical and support personnel to address the safe use of glucocorticoids for clinical purposes within anti-doping.

List Review Process
 
Every year, the List’s revision process is led by WADA, beginning with an initial meeting in January and concluding with the publication of the List by 1 October. This is an extensive consultation process that includes WADA’s List Expert Group gathering information including the latest scientific and medical research, trends, and intelligence gathered from law enforcement and pharmaceutical companies; circulating a draft List among stakeholders; taking their submissions into consideration and revising the draft, followed by review by the Agency’s Health, Medical and Research (HMR) Committee. The HMR Committee then makes its recommendations to the WADA ExCo, which approves the List during its September meeting.

The original article can be found here.

Leave a comment

Please login to leave a comment.

Courses

Legal Advisors

Upcoming Events

There are no up-coming events

Copyright © LawInSport Limited 2010 - 2021. These pages contain general information only. Nothing in these pages constitutes legal advice. You should consult a suitably qualified lawyer on any specific legal problem or matter. The information provided here was accurate as of the day it was posted; however, the law may have changed since that date. This information is not intended to be, and should not be used as, a substitute for taking legal advice in any specific situation. LawInSport is not responsible for any actions taken or not taken on the basis of this information. Please refer to the full terms and conditions on our website.